Morbid Obesity ICD 10: Definition, Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Introduction

Obesity is a major health issue worldwide and is often associated with various chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. In medical coding, obesity is classified using ICD 10 codes.

Morbid obesity, which is a severe form of obesity, is also classified using a specific ICD 10 code. This article will discuss in detail morbid obesity ICD 10, its definition, causes, symptoms, and treatment.

What is Morbid Obesity ICD 10?

Morbid obesity is defined as a condition where the body mass index (BMI) is greater than or equal to 40 kg/m². It is a severe form of obesity that can cause serious health problems. ICD 10 (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision) is a medical classification system that is used to classify and code diseases, symptoms, and medical procedures. Morbid obesity is classified using the ICD 10 code E66.01.

How is Morbid Obesity ICD 10 Coded?

The ICD 10 code for morbid obesity is E66.01. The code E66 is used to classify obesity, and the code E66.01 is used to classify morbid obesity. The code E66.01 should be used when the BMI is equal to or greater than 40 kg/m².

Causes of Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Morbid Obesity ICD 10

The causes of morbid obesity are multifactorial and can include genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors.

Genetic factors can play a significant role in the development of morbid obesity, with some individuals being more predisposed to the condition than others.

Environmental factors such as diet and physical activity levels also play a role. In addition, certain medical conditions such as hypothyroidism, Cushing’s syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome can contribute to the development of morbid obesity.

Diet is a significant factor in the development of morbid obesity. Consuming a high-calorie diet with an excess of carbohydrates, fats, and sugars can lead to an accumulation of body fat, particularly around the waistline. Physical inactivity is another contributing factor, as it leads to a reduction in energy expenditure and a build-up of body fat.

Moreover, certain medications can cause weight gain and contribute to the development of morbid obesity. Antidepressants, corticosteroids, and antipsychotics are some examples of medications that have been linked to weight gain.

Symptoms of Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Symptoms of morbid obesity may include:

  1. Excessive weight gain: People with morbid obesity will often have a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher, which equates to being at least 100 pounds overweight for men and 80 pounds overweight for women.
  2. Difficulty breathing: Morbid obesity can cause shortness of breath and respiratory issues, including sleep apnea.
  3. Joint pain: Carrying extra weight puts a strain on the joints, which can cause pain, stiffness, and limited mobility.
  4. Diabetes: Morbid obesity increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
  5. High blood pressure: People with morbid obesity are more likely to have high blood pressure, which can lead to heart disease, stroke, and other health complications.
  6. Heart disease: Morbid obesity increases the risk of heart disease, including heart attacks, heart failure, and arrhythmias.
  7. Infertility: Morbid obesity can affect fertility in both men and women.
  8. Depression and anxiety: People with morbid obesity may experience mental health issues, including depression and anxiety, related to their weight and body image.

If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of morbid obesity, it’s important to seek medical advice and treatment from a qualified healthcare professional.

Diagnosis of Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Morbid obesity is typically diagnosed based on a person’s body mass index (BMI) and their overall health. A BMI of 40 or higher is considered morbidly obese, while a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese.

In addition to BMI, healthcare professionals may also consider other factors when diagnosing morbid obesity, such as:

  1. Waist circumference: A waist circumference of 40 inches or more for men and 35 inches or more for women may indicate an increased risk of health complications related to obesity.
  2. Health history: A person’s health history, including any past medical conditions or surgeries, may be taken into account when diagnosing morbid obesity.
  3. Physical exam: A physical exam may be conducted to check for signs of health complications related to obesity, such as high blood pressure or joint pain.
  4. Blood tests: Blood tests may be ordered to check for related health conditions, such as diabetes, high cholesterol, or liver disease.

Health Risks Associated with Morbid Obesity

Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Some of the health risks associated with morbid obesity include:

  1. Type 2 diabetes: Morbid obesity increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, which can lead to serious health complications, such as heart disease, nerve damage, and kidney damage.
  2. Heart disease: Morbid obesity is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, including coronary artery disease, heart attack, and heart failure.
  3. High blood pressure: People with morbid obesity are more likely to have high blood pressure, which can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and other health complications.
  4. Stroke: Morbid obesity increases the risk of stroke, which occurs when blood flow to the brain is blocked or interrupted.
  5. Sleep apnea: Morbid obesity is a common cause of sleep apnea, a condition in which a person’s breathing is repeatedly interrupted during sleep.
  6. Joint problems: Carrying excess weight puts a strain on the joints, which can lead to joint pain, stiffness, and osteoarthritis.
  7. Gastrointestinal disorders: Morbid obesity is associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal disorders, such as gallstones, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
  8. Cancer: Morbid obesity is associated with an increased risk of several types of cancer, including breast, colon, and pancreatic cancer.
  9. Infertility: Morbid obesity can affect fertility in both men and women.
  10. Mental health issues: People with morbid obesity may experience mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety, related to their weight and body image.

Treatment Options for Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Morbid Obesity ICD 10

There are several treatment options for morbid obesity, including:

  1. Lifestyle changes: Making changes to your diet and exercise habits is often the first line of treatment for morbid obesity. A healthcare professional can help you develop a healthy eating plan and exercise routine that meets your needs and goals.
  2. Medications: In some cases, medications may be used to help manage weight and reduce the risk of related health complications. These medications may work by reducing appetite or blocking the absorption of fat in the body.
  3. Bariatric surgery: Bariatric surgery, such as gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy, may be recommended for people with morbid obesity who have not been able to achieve significant weight loss through lifestyle changes or medications. These surgeries work by restricting the amount of food that can be eaten and/or reducing the absorption of nutrients in the body.
  4. Behavioral therapy: Behavioral therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy or motivational interviewing, may be used to help people with morbid obesity make lasting lifestyle changes and overcome any underlying psychological factors that may be contributing to their weight gain.
  5. Support groups: Joining a support group, such as a weight loss or bariatric surgery support group, can provide emotional support and encouragement from others who are going through similar experiences.

It’s important to work with a qualified healthcare professional to determine the best treatment options for your individual needs and goals. They can provide guidance on the benefits and risks of each treatment option and help you make an informed decision.

Lifestyle Changes to Manage Morbid Obesity

Eating Healthy and making lifestyle changes

Making lifestyle changes is an important component of managing morbid obesity. Here are some lifestyle changes that can help manage morbid obesity:

  1. Dietary changes: A healthcare professional can help you develop a healthy eating plan that meets your nutritional needs and supports weight loss. This may involve reducing portion sizes, limiting the intake of high-calorie and high-fat foods, and increasing consumption of fruits, vegetables, and lean protein sources.
  2. Regular exercise: Regular physical activity is important for weight loss and overall health. A healthcare professional can recommend an exercise plan that is safe and effective for your individual needs and abilities.
  3. Behavioral therapy: Behavioral therapy can help people with morbid obesity make lasting lifestyle changes by addressing underlying psychological factors that may be contributing to weight gain. This may involve strategies such as goal setting, self-monitoring, and stress management.
  4. Support systems: Having a support system, such as a family member, friend, or support group, can provide encouragement and motivation to maintain healthy lifestyle changes.
  5. Stress management: Stress can contribute to overeating and weight gain. Finding healthy ways to manage stress, such as through meditation, yoga, or counseling, can help manage morbid obesity.
  6. Sleep hygiene: Getting adequate sleep is important for weight management and overall health. A healthcare professional can provide guidance on developing healthy sleep habits, such as sticking to a regular sleep schedule and avoiding electronic devices before bedtime.

Must Read: The Best Time to Sleep and Wake Up: The Science of Sleep

It’s important to work with a qualified healthcare professional to develop a personalized plan for managing morbid obesity. They can provide guidance and support to help you make sustainable lifestyle changes and achieve your weight loss goals.

Surgical Procedures for Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Surgical Procedure

Surgical procedures are an option for people with morbid obesity who have not been able to achieve significant weight loss through lifestyle changes or medications. Here are some surgical procedures that may be recommended for managing morbid obesity:

  1. Gastric bypass surgery: Gastric bypass surgery involves creating a small stomach pouch and rerouting the small intestine to this new pouch. This limits the amount of food that can be eaten at one time and reduces the absorption of calories and nutrients in the body.
  2. Sleeve gastrectomy: Sleeve gastrectomy involves removing a large portion of the stomach and creating a smaller, banana-shaped stomach. This reduces the amount of food that can be eaten at one time and reduces the production of hunger hormones.
  3. Adjustable gastric banding: Adjustable gastric banding involves placing a silicone band around the upper portion of the stomach to create a small pouch. The band can be adjusted over time to control the amount of food that can be eaten.
  4. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch: This surgery involves removing a large portion of the stomach and rerouting the small intestine to reduce the amount of calories and nutrients that can be absorbed.

Surgical procedures for morbid obesity carry some risks, including bleeding, infection, and blood clots. It’s important to discuss the risks and benefits of each procedure with a qualified healthcare professional and to carefully consider whether surgery is the right option for you.

After surgery, ongoing follow-up care with a healthcare professional is important to ensure successful weight loss and to manage any potential complications.

Medications for Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Medications may be used as a treatment option for morbid obesity to help manage weight and reduce the risk of related health complications. Here are some medications that may be used:

  1. Orlistat: Orlistat works by blocking the absorption of fat in the body. This can help reduce calorie intake and promote weight loss. Orlistat may cause gastrointestinal side effects, such as diarrhea and abdominal pain.
  2. Liraglutide: Liraglutide is a medication that is used to treat type 2 diabetes but has also been approved for weight management in people with obesity. It works by reducing appetite and promoting feelings of fullness. Liraglutide may cause gastrointestinal side effects, such as nausea and vomiting.
  3. Phentermine: Phentermine is a stimulant that suppresses appetite and can help with weight loss. However, it is not recommended for long-term use due to the risk of side effects, such as increased blood pressure and heart rate.
  4. Naltrexone-bupropion: This medication is a combination of two drugs that work together to reduce appetite and promote weight loss. Naltrexone-bupropion may cause side effects such as nausea, constipation, and headache.

Medications for morbid obesity should be used in conjunction with lifestyle changes, such as dietary modifications and exercise.

Note: It’s important to work with a qualified healthcare professional to determine if medication is an appropriate treatment option and to closely monitor any potential side effects.

Psychological Interventions for Morbid Obesity

In addition to medical interventions like bariatric surgery and medication, psychological interventions can also play a role in helping individuals with morbid obesity.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psychological intervention that has shown promise in helping people with morbid obesity. CBT focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to obesity, such as emotional eating and a lack of physical activity. In CBT, individuals learn skills to help them manage their eating behaviors, cope with stress without turning to food, and increase their physical activity levels.

Another psychological intervention that has been used to treat morbid obesity is mindfulness-based interventions. Mindfulness involves being present and non-judgmental in the moment. Mindfulness-based interventions for obesity typically involve practices like mindful eating, where individuals learn to pay attention to the physical sensations of hunger and fullness and eat only when hungry, as well as mindful movement, where individuals learn to be more aware of their body and the physical sensations associated with exercise.

Finally, support groups can be a helpful psychological intervention for individuals with morbid obesity. Support groups can provide a sense of community, accountability, and motivation for individuals working to lose weight. In addition, they can provide a space for individuals to share their experiences and learn from others who are going through similar struggles.

It’s important to note that psychological interventions should not be used as a substitute for medical interventions, such as bariatric surgery or medication, but rather as a complement to them. A multidisciplinary approach that includes both medical and psychological interventions may provide the best outcomes for individuals with morbid obesity.

Complications of Morbid Obesity Treatment

Morbid obesity treatment can come with potential complications. These complications can occur during or after the treatment and can range from mild to severe. Some of the common complications of morbid obesity treatment include:

  1. Infection: Any surgery carries the risk of infection. Infections can range from minor skin infections to life-threatening systemic infections.
  2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding can occur during or after surgery, and it may require additional procedures to stop the bleeding.
  3. Blood clots: Blood clots can form in the legs or lungs after surgery, which can be life-threatening if not treated immediately.
  4. Nutritional deficiencies: After certain weight loss surgeries, patients may develop deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. These deficiencies can lead to a variety of health problems, including anemia, osteoporosis, and neurological problems.
  5. Dumping syndrome: This occurs when food moves too quickly through the digestive system after surgery, causing nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dizziness.
  6. Gallstones: Rapid weight loss after surgery can increase the risk of gallstones.
  7. Bowel obstruction: The risk of bowel obstruction increases after certain weight loss surgeries.
  8. Failure to lose weight: In some cases, patients may not lose as much weight as they had hoped or may regain weight after initial weight loss.

It’s important to discuss these potential complications with your healthcare provider before undergoing any morbid obesity treatment. They can help you weigh the potential risks and benefits of the treatment and help you make an informed decision about your health.

Prevention of Morbid Obesity ICD 10

Exercising to lose weight

Preventing morbid obesity involves making healthy lifestyle choices and adopting behaviors that promote overall health and wellness. Here are some tips for preventing morbid obesity:

  1. Adopt a healthy diet: Eating a balanced diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats can help you maintain a healthy weight and reduce your risk of developing obesity.
  2. Engage in regular physical activity: Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity, such as brisk walking, cycling, or swimming, most days of the week.
  3. Get enough sleep: Getting enough sleep can help regulate hormones that control hunger and appetite, and may help prevent overeating.
  4. Manage stress: Chronic stress can lead to overeating and weight gain. Find healthy ways to manage stress, such as through exercise, meditation, or therapy.
  5. Limit sugary and high-calorie beverages: Beverages like soda, fruit juice, and sweetened tea or coffee can add a lot of empty calories to your diet. Choose water or low-calorie beverages instead.
  6. Avoid fast food and processed foods: These foods are often high in calories, unhealthy fats, and sodium, and can contribute to weight gain.
  7. Be mindful of portion sizes: Use smaller plates and bowls, and avoid eating until you feel overly full.

By adopting these healthy habits, you can reduce your risk of developing morbid obesity and other health problems associated with being overweight or obese.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

Sure, here are some frequently asked questions about morbid obesity:

Q: What is morbid obesity?

A: Morbid obesity is a medical condition that is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher. It is considered a severe form of obesity and can lead to a number of health problems.

Q: What causes morbid obesity?

A: Morbid obesity is typically caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Factors that may contribute to morbid obesity include a sedentary lifestyle, poor eating habits, certain medical conditions, and certain medications.

Q: What are the health risks associated with morbid obesity?

A: Morbid obesity can lead to a number of serious health problems, including high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, sleep apnea, joint problems, and certain types of cancer.

Q: How is morbid obesity treated?

A: Morbid obesity is typically treated with a combination of diet, exercise, behavioral therapy, and, in some cases, medication or surgery.

Q: Can morbid obesity be cured?

A: Morbid obesity cannot be cured, but it can be managed through lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise, and medical interventions, such as medication and surgery.

Q: How can morbid obesity be prevented?

A: Preventing morbid obesity involves maintaining a healthy diet and getting regular exercise. It is also important to address any underlying medical conditions and to avoid medications that may contribute to weight gain.

Q: What is the difference between morbid obesity and obesity?

A: Morbid obesity is a more severe form of obesity, typically defined as having a BMI of 40 or higher. Obesity is typically defined as having a BMI of 30 or higher.

Q: Can morbid obesity be genetic?

A: Yes, there is a genetic component to morbid obesity. People with a family history of obesity are more likely to develop morbid obesity themselves.

WHO on obesity


Read More Latest Articles

Explore some of more latest articles by The Healthy Website:

1 thought on “Morbid Obesity ICD 10: Definition, Causes, Symptoms & Treatment”

  1. Pingback: Benefits of Running in Morning: Start Your Day Right

Comments are closed.

Scroll to Top